About Me

I am currently a medical student at University of California- Irvine School of Medicine. When I am not in the library cramming away, you can find me in a small yet homey kitchen of my apartment. 

I started cooking in 2012 when I moved to the U.S., out of sheer desperate craving for my hometown cuisines. As a naive, inexperienced, yet hungry teenager, I called my mother back in Yangon, and asked for a recipe for "kyat-tar-arrloo-see-pyan", which literally means "chicken potato curry". I turned on my phone speaker and wrote down everything. In retrospect, it was less of a recipe and more of my mom way of implying you-cannot-hold-a-knife-honey-you-shouldn't-cook. But, being young and reckless, I went to the nearest Walmart, and bought a package of chicken thighs, a sack of potatoes, some garlic, onions and spices. Finally, I was in the kitchen, armed with a small pairing knife, and my mission was to cube the chicken and potatoes without harming myself or my roommate. Mission quickly aborted when I realized my knife was not equipped to cut through the bones. From then, things went downhill pretty quickly. I cut myself while peeling potatoes, burned the onions to the point they became dark crust on the pan, yet still managed to undercook the chicken. 

In a nutshell, my first cooking experience was similar to a crappy horror movie - I knew things were going to go badly, but still went into the room to check if the killer is there. But, that day, I did discover how much I enjoyed the process of cooking. The more I cook, the more captivated I became by the almost-spiritual experience of how unprocessed raw ingredients combine together to give dishes powerful enough to evoke our emotions. Behind each recipe lies a story of preserverence, creativity, love and history. Every time I taste a (well-thought out) dish, I felt a privileged invitation to get a glimpse of the individual's inner core. To me, this experience is priceless.

I also cannot take a picture, without looking like a serial killer. Don’t believe me. See for yourself below.












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11 comments:

  1. Congrat bro , u finally made it! Proud of you !!!:)

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  2. Love your story. Good for you. Look forward to following your blog!

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  3. Loveeee. I can't get enough of your blog!

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  4. Love your blog!! And congrats on winning the Saveur award ;)

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  5. I'm enjoying exploring some of your recipes. You make them sound not too hard! The chick pea flour tofu is great with the salad. Loved that one especially.

    Keep up the good work! MaryLouise

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  6. I absolutely love your about me page. It is so funny and deep at the same time. Your horror movie analogy and your first cooking experience made me laugh. I agree with you that cooking is a creative outlet and a reflection of our inner selves. It's so moving how food can evoke memories and emotions. The way your expressed that is so beautiful and well-written. I look forward to continuing to share food with you at our food blogger meetings and to getting a glimpse of our souls through our food. Warmly, Dana

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  7. I think Japanese knife is better than burmese knife.Once upon a time i used burmese knife but at the moment i avoid it because of Rohinga Muslim issues. I would like to suggest everyone please avoid burmese knife.

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